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The Emancipation Proclamation

Learning Goals

Today we’re going to discuss Lincoln's motivations and intentions were when he issued the Emancipation Proclamation. We will put ourselves in the shoes of Abraham Lincoln when he released it. Considering decisions through the perspective of a person in history is a good way to understand the decisions they made and how they impacted the world. 

Content & Multimedia

Today, the Emancipation Proclamation seems to be common sense, and it can be hard to imagine the time when it was controversial. When Abraham Lincoln released the proclamation, he had thought about it for many months, with his goal being to settle the tensions of the civil war. 

Click here to see the Emancipation Proclamation.

Watch the video below:


Discussion Questions

Now it’s time to share your thoughts. In your submission answer the following questions:

1. Put yourself in the shoes of Lincoln prior to making the Emancipation Proclamation and write a journal entry prior to releasing the Emancipation Proclamation. Use these questions to craft your entry:
  • What do you think were his main considerations before issuing it?
  • What did he hope the Emancipation Proclamation would achieve?
  • Since the civil war was in full swing, what might have been his hesitations to release it? What might have been his worries?

→ Write about these ideas in the form of a journal - kind of like you are talking to yourself. Make it super realistic, like you are actually experiencing the problems!  Use details to make the entry realistic for the time period.

Peer Feedback

After submitting your response, read at least two of your classmates’ responses and post a reply.

  • Did they change your perspective in any way?
  • Can you build on their ideas?
  • What did you find interesting or compelling about this submission? 

It’s okay to take a stance even if you’re not fully convinced one way or another. In fact, it’s a good thing to try and see issues from an alternative perspective.

Stay Curious!

(you can edit before inviting students)
Author:
Allison Gordon
Subject Area:
Government & Politics ,  Social Studies ,  Philosophy & Ethics
Level:
Collections:
Early American History
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